Wednesday, 19 January 2011

IVF is on. Really, this time.

"I bet you thought you'd never get here," chortled the Doctor as he impaled me, performing the mock Enbryo transfer, just to check everything was in order for the real thing. 

"I'm still not sure I will," I said and repeated was I thought was a classic line about not wanting to count my eggs until they were embryos.

He gave me a strange look, and hurriedly removed the speculum.

Everything else went smoothly, he didn't think it was necessary to check my tubes as that had been done relatively recently so he gave me the all clear to proceed to IVF.  Not wanting to get my hopes dashed again I double checked. "So there is nothing more that you are waiting for that might stop me having IVF."

His response was emphatic, "No ..." and then less so, "... unless there are any more blood tests to be done."

There are more bloods but that is in hand so unless the husband or I have contracted HIV in the last 12 months (which is highly unlikely) we are good to go.

My next stop was the nurse. Who gave me my first set of instructions, they tell you things on a need to know basis.

I will continue to take the pill until the 8th of February.

On the 5th of February I have to start injecting myself with Buserelin. A treat from the selection of drugs I picked up back in November. Ironically this drug is to suppress my ovaries, the next stage is to fire them up again - but we didn't talk about that, it is very much one step at a time.

"You don't have the Buserelin with you" she stated "so it is a bit difficult to explain how you do the injections."

"Ah! But I do" I countered, and delved into my Mary Poppins bag to retrieve one of every different type of drug and needle I possess. I took no chances this morning as I packed that bag with everything including my medical notes, passport, marriage certificate, painkillers, sanitary towels and a good book. I am not a naturally organised person but, without wanting to sound more smug than normal I think I am starting to get a handle on how to deal with the NHS; think like a boy scout, be prepared.

So she talked me through the injection process as I scribbled down every word. She didn't actually give me a physical demonstration, and I am a little nervous about the self-injecting thing, but I have no doubt that'll be a post in itself.

I now don't have to communicate with any doctors or nurses until my period starts at some point after I stop taking the pill on the 8th of February.

I'm starting to think that this might actually happen.


35 comments:

  1. Glad it's looking good so far. If it is the short really thin needle then it's not a big deal. I had my husband do the first, I did the second slowly and did the third fast. Turns out the best way for me was to put the needle close to my skin, look away and push. The worst it hurt was when I watched and did it slow; it's a quick push in to the skin and then push down the plunger.
    Of all the things that have been done to me, those needles were the least of my worries. Just go for it like I did, it's not too bad that way. Sometimes it hurt a little more than usual, but still not a lot of pain. GOOD LUCK!

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  2. OH YAY! It's a go! This is great news.. Well done WFI! Honestly, this in itself is quite an achievement. Let's celebrate!

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  3. Not that I'm stalking you but I've been checking in to see how todays appt went and think I'll be the first to say 'Hurray!. So glad todays appt didn't put any barriers in the way of you going ahead with IVF. Can you train P to give you the injections, or would that be far worse for everyone? lots of love Wig x oh millions of people have got in before me with their comments, you are so popular!

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  4. How exciting! Well done on being so organized and prepared, you totally rocked (in a boy scout kind of way :)

    Keeping everything crossed that all steps on the way go as smooth as possible and that the outcome is what you hope for!

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  5. Oh, and a tip on giving yourself injections that worked really well for me was to have hubby (or other willing volunteer) count loudly to three and me immediately plunging/stabbing the needle in on three. You'll do great!

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  6. LOL about your Mary Poppins bag and being prepared. Congrats on a clear start! There are many videos for injections so you'll be fine! Of course I've never injected myself, DH gets that honor :).

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  7. Yippee!! Wow, were you prepared, or what?

    Don't worry about self-injections. I found it easier than anticipating someone else doing it to me.

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  8. Nice job being so prepared. I'm kind of amazed you managed to fit all that in to one purse. I would have needed a suitcase. :)

    Congrats!

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  9. Holy crap! Finally!
    I love that you were so prepared and were able to have the little lesson on the spot.

    This is so exciting!

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  10. At long last!!! I am so pleased!
    x

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  11. Yay, yay, yay!

    May the fertility gods continue to smile down upon you!

    Can't wait to keep reading your story and hopefully happy ending by what, the end of Feb / early March?

    Yay!

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  12. Great news! You'll be a dab hand with a needle in no time.

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  13. I've just done a little dance.
    Of joy, obviously...

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  14. That is so awesome. Your persistance paid off! You should totally check with the scouts to see if there is a badge for IVF!

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  15. So glad you got good news!!! Best of luck on this journey!

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  16. so glad you got the green light!!! if you have an extra needle and syringe, a clemintine is a good way to practice giving the injections :) (random tip). The little ones are a breeze...

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  17. Humour - ALWAYS wasted on doctors.
    Such great news Liz - I'm with you every step, as I see, are so many others.
    X

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  18. Yay!!
    BTW, the two dates you mentioned are the birthdays of my brother and brother-in-law. I hope that's a good sign :)

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  19. Oh about bloody time, hooray! Busceriline (however spelt) is not too bad, I know this sounds stupid but just be sure to measure it out properly, I had a friend who got it significantly wrong in a 5am "must get ready for work" haze and it screwed up her cycle, that panicked me into triple checking before injecting each time - just thought I'd mention! I found the injections fine, simple and not too painful, just do it quickly and don't think about it. (If you get gonal F for stims those injections are better, lovely little injector gun thing with a teensy weensy needle, all very simple). I found the drug made me a bit down and emotionally delicate, I needed a few early nights and for life not to be too tough during that time but soon perked up when the stims came along (lovely estrogen!).

    Good luck - it's exciting isn't it!

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  20. Repeat after me: this will happen. This will happen. This will happen. And it looks like it will happen imminently. Hurrah for some good news in the blogosphere, and well done for showing up so prepared.

    In terms of the injections, the first day is the scariest. It can be a bit fiddly. Especially if you have to reconstitute anything (powders, liquids, this needle, that). But just take it slowly, and give yourself plenty of time. The actual jabs are not as terrible as they seem, and ice helps. Also, though I'm sure there is a UK equivalent, Freedom Meds has a website with instructional videos for the lot: pens, hypodermics, etc.. Plus, Mel's Stirrup Queen's website has links to youtube videos that show the same.

    Before long, you will feel like a mad scientist, mixing up batches of medical wonder.

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  21. That's fantastic news! What a great way to start 2011.

    I can't believe they didn't have the equipment to show you how to inject yourself. That is poor but I do agree with taking everything one step at a time. The Buserilin injections are OK, before you know it you will be doing them without even thinking about them. Roll on February...

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  22. That is so exciting! I hope the next few weeks go quickly for you. Good luck!

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  23. Oh exciting! Progress. Don't worry about the injections I can't even look when I get blood taken yet I managed to inject myself on time and well, no problem. I found the injections one of the easy parts of IVF. Hope you do to.

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  24. I must add that is very lax standards about you not being shown well how to inject yourself, I had a nurse show me on a 'fake' belly, I had brochures and a wonderful dvd to follow along with. Your NHS does sound so shit!

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  25. Excellent news Liz. Sorry I'm only getting to this now, I have gotten out of the blogging habit of late. Best of luck.

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  26. I wanted you know to know I gave you an award. You're linked to my blog. I hope all is still going well and looking forward to new posts!

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